Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
David:
Welcome to ChineseClass101.com. I’m David.
Gimmy:
大家好, 我係Gimmy.
David:
And we’re here today with Beginner Season 1, Lesson 22.
Gimmy:
Leaving Hong Kong.
David:
Right. And if you live and work in Hong Kong, it’s really common for people to just leave the island for the weekend.
Gimmy:
It’s so convenient.
David:
Yeah.
Gimmy:
There’s so many places to go.
David:
You’ve got Thailand, you’ve the Philippines, you’ve got Bali. It’s really common.
Gimmy:
Nice. Yeah.
David:
So our dialogue today takes place between two friends and they’re talking with another friend who’s taking the weekend somewhere else.
Gimmy:
This is casual Cantonese as spoken in Hong Kong.
David:
Let’s listen.

Lesson conversation

A:
佢聽日飛呀?
B:
係啩,唔知呀。
A:
飛邊度呀?
B:
我估泰國啩。
David:
One more time, a bit slower.
A:
佢聽日飛呀?
B:
係啩,唔知呀。
A:
飛邊度呀?
B:
我估泰國啩。
David:
And now, with the English translation.
A:
佢聽日飛呀?
A:
Is he flying tomorrow?
B:
係啩,唔知呀。
B:
Maybe, I don't know.
A:
飛邊度呀?
A:
Where is he flying to?
B:
我估泰國啩。
B:
I guess maybe Thailand?
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
David:
Because they have really nice beaches in Thailand.
Gimmy:
Nice food, nice massages too.
David:
Well, Hong Kong, you’ve got the food, you’ve got the massages, but we’re still working on the beaches. You got to give us a bit of time.
Gimmy:
Yes.
David:
Anyway, our vocab section today is partly review and partly new. Let’s get to it.
VOCAB LIST
Gimmy:
聽日 [natural native speed].
David:
Tomorrow.
Gimmy:
聽日 [slowly - broken down by syllable]. 聽日 [natural native speed].
Gimmy:
今日 [natural native speed].
David:
Today.
Gimmy:
今日 [slowly - broken down by syllable]. 今日 [natural native speed].
Gimmy:
尋日 [natural native speed].
David:
Yesterday.
Gimmy:
尋日 [slowly - broken down by syllable]. 尋日 [natural native speed].
Gimmy:
飛 [natural native speed].
David:
To fly.
Gimmy:
飛 [slowly - broken down by syllable]. 飛 [natural native speed].
Gimmy:
唔知 [natural native speed].
David:
Not to know.
Gimmy:
唔知 [slowly - broken down by syllable]. 唔知 [natural native speed].
Gimmy:
邊度 [natural native speed]
David:
Where.
Gimmy:
邊度 [slowly - broken down by syllable]. 邊度 [natural native speed].
Gimmy:
估 [natural native speed].
David:
To guess.
Gimmy:
估 [slowly - broken down by syllable]. 估 [natural native speed].
Gimmy:
泰國 [natural native speed].
David:
Thailand.
Gimmy:
泰國 [slowly - broken down by syllable]. 泰國 [natural native speed].
KEY VOCABULARY AND PHRASES
David:
The first thing we want to do is review the words for yesterday, today, and tomorrow. Today is…
Gimmy:
今日.
David:
“Today.”
Gimmy:
今日.
David:
“I’m traveling today.”
Gimmy:
我今日飛.
David:
“I’m traveling to Thailand today.”
Gimmy:
我今日飛泰國.
David:
Just drop and mention of this in conversation and your friends will be impressed, right? And there’s that word “to travel” there.
Gimmy:
飛.
David:
“To travel.”
Gimmy:
飛.
David:
Literally, this means “to fly.”
Gimmy:
Right.
David:
But people will use it “I’m going to Thailand.”
Gimmy:
Yes, people use 飛 a lot in Hong Kong just to refer to traveling.
David:
Right. So it is literally “flying”…
Gimmy:
飛.
David:
…but it means “traveling.”
Gimmy:
Right.
David:
Is this the same character as the word for “ticket” we ran into before?
Gimmy:
No, but it’s the same sound.
David:
Right. So “traveling”….
Gimmy:
飛.
David:
…sound like “ticket.”
Gimmy:
飛.
David:
In our dialogue, we have the word “tomorrow.”
Gimmy:
聽日.
David:
“Tomorrow.”
Gimmy:
聽日.
David:
“Is he flying tomorrow?”
Gimmy:
佢聽日飛呀?
David:
“Is he flying tomorrow?”
Gimmy:
佢聽日飛呀?
David:
Right. And also the word “yesterday.”
Gimmy:
尋日.
David:
“Yesterday.”
Gimmy:
尋日.
David:
And Hong Kong is one of the few places where you can actually say “I was in Thailand yesterday.”
Gimmy:
我尋日喺泰國.
David:
“I was in Thailand yesterday.”
Gimmy:
我尋日喺泰國.
David:
Although so many people travel, you’re probably not going to impress your friends that much.
Gimmy:
Right.
David:
We have a couple of new words here, of course. The first is “to fly”…
Gimmy:
飛.
David:
…which also means “to travel.”
Gimmy:
飛.
David:
As in our dialogue, “where are you going?”
Gimmy:
飛邊度呀?
David:
So you might ask a friend “where are you going?”
Gimmy:
你飛邊度呀?
David:
“Where are you going?”
Gimmy:
你飛邊度呀?
David:
If I’m not actually taking a plane though, should I use 飛?
Gimmy:
No. 飛 include the motion of flying but then it’s really flying on the airplane.
David:
Right, because you don’t really take a boat places from Hong Kong.
Gimmy:
No.
David:
Maybe to the mainland.
Gimmy:
Yes.
David:
The last word we want to highlight is the word “to guess.”
Gimmy:
估.
David:
“To guess.”
Gimmy:
估.
David:
And in our grammar section, we’re going to talk about guessing and how to sound uncertain.
Gimmy:
Right.

Lesson focus

David:
It’s grammar time!
David:
Gimmy, what’s grammar focus today?
Gimmy:
Today, we’re going to talk about guessing and uncertainty.
David:
Right. Take a look at this line from our dialogue.
Gimmy:
我估泰國啩.
David:
“I guess maybe Thailand.”
Gimmy:
我估泰國啩.
David:
How about “I guess maybe China”?
Gimmy:
我估中國啩.
David:
“I guess China maybe.”
Gimmy:
我估中國啩.
David:
So first, we have the subject and then the verb.
Gimmy:
我估.
David:
“I guess.”
Gimmy:
我估.
David:
“He guesses.”
Gimmy:
佢估.
David:
“She guesses.”
Gimmy:
佢估.
David:
“You guess.”
Gimmy:
你估.
David:
The rest of the sentence is straightforward “I guess Thailand.”
Gimmy:
我估泰國.
David:
But then we have an extra sound on the end of the our sentence.
Gimmy:
啩.
David:
It’s this sound that adds this feeling of uncertainty.
Gimmy:
Right, 啩.
David:
Listen to some of the following examples. “Maybe.”
Gimmy:
係啩.
David:
“Maybe.”
Gimmy:
係啩.
David:
Or “maybe not.”
Gimmy:
唔係啩.
David:
“Maybe not.”
Gimmy:
唔係啩.
David:
If you’re holding a party and talking about who might come and who might not come, you might have this discussion with a friend.
Gimmy:
我估佢會去啩.
David:
“I guess he might go.”
Gimmy:
我估佢會嚟啩.
David:
“I guess he might come.”
Gimmy:
我估佢會嚟啩.
David:
Right. Or let’s say you’re planning a night out. Maybe you’re trying to decide what to do. You could say, “Well, I guess maybe a restaurant.”
Gimmy:
我估去餐廳啩.
David:
“I guess maybe a restaurant.”
Gimmy:
我估去餐廳啩.
David:
Or maybe you’re talking about a new friend and you’re guessing what his job is. You asked a friend, “What does he do?”
Gimmy:
佢做咩㗎?
David:
“What does he do?”
Gimmy:
佢做咩㗎?
David:
But they don’t know either or maybe they only have…
Gimmy:
Some clue.
David:
Yeah, a couple of clues. He’s always traveling. They might say….
Gimmy:
佢可能係機師啩.
David:
“I guess maybe a pilot.”
Gimmy:
我估佢可能係機師啩.
David:
“I guess maybe a pilot.” So there are two parts to this sentence. The first is….
Gimmy:
估.
David:
“To guess.”
Gimmy:
估.
David:
The second is finishing our sentence with this sound.
Gimmy:
啩.
David:
The second is optional. In our dialogue, the speaker could have just said…
Gimmy:
泰國啩.
David:
“Maybe Thailand.”
Gimmy:
泰國啩.
David:
So this is really easy grammar point but using it is going make your Cantonese much more expressive.
Gimmy:
Or much more uncertain.

Outro

David:
Right. For now though, that’s all the time we have today. I’m David.
Gimmy:
我係Gimmy.
David:
Thanks a lot for listening and we’ll see you on the site.
Gimmy:
多謝收聽,網上見.

17 Comments

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CantoneseClass101.com
Monday at 6:30 pm
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Which destination is close to your country for a quick escape?

Friday at 10:00 am
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Mexico 墨西哥國家

Monday at 7:28 am
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Hi Steven,

日本 is a nice place to go. 😄

Siuling
Team CantoneseClass101.com

Sunday at 7:31 am
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Japan 日本國家

Sunday at 11:04 am
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Hello Chris,

飛( fei1) means “fly” as a verb and it also means “ticket” when it is used as a noun.

Sometimes there are vocabularies in Cantonese that you know how to pronounce them but you don`t know how to write them down especially in the colloquial usage. People tend to use the word with the same pronunciation to substitute the word they don`t know how to write. So 飛( fei1) is the colloquial expression of “ticket” and 票 (piu3) is the formal written form of it.

買飛(maai5 fei1) ~ buy ticket
車票 (ce1 piu3) ~ transportation ticket
車飛( ce1 fei1) ~ transportation ticket

Thank you so much for your question.

Siuling
Team CantoneseClass101.com

Chris
Monday at 12:25 pm
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This dialogue confuses me:

David: Right. So it is literally “flying”…
Gimmy: 飛.
David: …but it means “traveling.”
Gimmy: Right.
David: Is this the same character as the word for “ticket” we ran into before?
Gimmy: No, but it’s the same sound.
David: Right. So “traveling”….
Gimmy: 飛.
David: …sound like “ticket.”
Gimmy: 飛

In the pdf they seem to be the same character.

Tuesday at 9:42 pm
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Hi James,

Thank you very much for pointing that out, it’s fixed now 😅

Olivia
Team CantoneseClass101.com

James
Friday at 7:44 pm
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The third line is missing a letter… it starts with “ei1″… I’m guessing “fei1″ would be better😄

Monday at 12:12 am
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Hi HC,

Yes I can speak Japanese, but not totally fluent. So feel free to ask when you feel like comparing Cantonese with Japanese as well as Mandarin! 😉

Olivia
Team CantoneseClass101.com

HC
Friday at 11:52 am
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Hi Olivia,
Thanks for all the support.
I was wondering if you can speak Japanese? If not its totally alright. It just that sometimes I feel like comparing Cantonese words with not just Mandarin, but Japanese as well.

Thursday at 12:56 pm
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Hi Ciana,

“Goodbye” in Cantonese is very similar to English’s “bye-bye”, it’s 拜拜 (baai1 baai3) 😁

Olivia
Team CantoneseClass101.com